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Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

2 edition of Automatic exchange resin pilot plant for removal of textile dye wastes found in the catalog.

Automatic exchange resin pilot plant for removal of textile dye wastes

Allison Maggiolo

Automatic exchange resin pilot plant for removal of textile dye wastes

by Allison Maggiolo

  • 159 Want to read
  • 39 Currently reading

Published by Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, Office of Energy, Minerals, and Industry, Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory, for sale by the National Technical Information Service in Research Triangle Park, N.C, Springfield, Va .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Gums and resins.,
  • Dyes and dyeing.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Allison Maggiolo and J. Henry Sayles.
    SeriesEnvironmental protection technology series ; EPA-600/2-77-136, Research reporting series -- EPA-600/2-77-136.
    ContributionsSayles, J. Henry., Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (Research Triangle Park, N.C.)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationviii, 55 p. :
    Number of Pages55
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL17647231M

    Colour removal from textile effluents M Joshi', R Bansal & R Purwar The azo dye and pigment manufacturing plants produce a waste which has low pH, high colour, high organic content (high COD) and low amenability to exchange, adsorption, and membrane by: Find link is a tool written by Edward Betts. experimental plant to remove sulphur compounds from the flue gases. gums and gum resins, leading to pilot plant demonstration. To act as repository and provider of information on lac. RRT Global ( words) exact.

    A method of dye removal from wastewater includes producing activated carbon from heavy oil fly ash and using the activated carbon to adsorb dye in the wastewater. The heavy oil fly ash based activated carbon is produced using phosphoric acid based chemical activation. The dye can be removed from wastewater by contacting the wastewater with the activated by: 2. Certain impurities in the waste streams to be treated by ion exchange, in addition to magnesium, such as lead and other metals, calcium hard- ness, etc., would be retained by the exchange resin and problems re- lated to regeneration of the resin and reuse of the zinc could be expected.

    In general, the wastewater from textile industry contains many various dyes. To gain a widespread reception, the azo-degrading bacteria should exhibit decolorizing ability for a wide range of dyes, aeromonas hydrophila was selecte from six bacterial strains with the capability of degrading textile dyes (Chen et al, ).File Size: KB.   Electro Oxidation and Biodegradation of Textile Dye Effluent Containing Procion Blue 2G Using Fungal Strain Phanerochate Chrysosporium MTCC ; Automatic Control Design for Optimal Strategy in Fed-batch Culture with Coupled Feed of Glycerol and Alkali; Experimental Study of Silica Nano-Powder Synthesis Using a Diffusion Flame ReactorCited by:


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Automatic exchange resin pilot plant for removal of textile dye wastes by Allison Maggiolo Download PDF EPUB FB2

The objectives of this study is to demonstrate an automatic bench scale pilot unit using polymeric resins to remove dyes from textile wastes. The size and flow rates of the unit will be appropriately sized to obtain the ne- cessary data to ascertain costs and technical feasibility of a full scale re- sin exchange.

Automatic exchange resin pilot plant for removal of textile dye wastes Author: Allison Maggiolo ; J Henry Sayles ; Industrial Environmental Research Laboratory (Research Triangle Park, N.C.).

The dyes removal pe rcentage is inversely proportional to its concentration, the lower the dyes concentratio n, the higher the efficie ncy of dyes re moval. Adsorpton of Textile Dyes by Carbon Nanoadsorbents 44 Adsorption by CNTs and Their Composites 44 Adsorption by Graphene and Its Related Materials 59 Mechanism of Dye Adsorption onto Carbon-Based Nanoadsorbents 73 Conclusion and Future Perspectives 74 References 76 3.

Advanced Oxidation Processes for Removal of Dyes from. textile dye plant effluent. Experimental runs with EFFICIENCY EVALUATION OF TEXTILE BASIC DYE REMOVAL FROM WATER BY NANOFILTRATION A.

Torabian, Bihdendi, P. Zanganeh Ranjbar, *N. Razmkhah Faculty of the Environment, University of Tehran, Tehran, Iran Received 10 May ; revised 13 June ; accepted 30 June ABSTRACTCited by: 4. UF treatment is not widely used by the textile industry due to the low dye rejection [12], this is why, direct recycle of filtrate is not possible without further treatment.

Alves and Pinho [13] reported that UF is more suitable than reverse osmosis to decolourize the wastewaters supply by the tanning industry because the dyes are bound to fats. The use of low-cost adsorbent has been investigated as a replacement for the current expensive methods of removing dyes from wastewater.

As such, fly ash generated in National Thermal Power plant was collected and converted into a low-cost adsorbent. The prepared adsorbent was characterized and used for the removal of dyes from by: and the best available technologies (BAT) for their removal from textile effluents.

Textile operations and water pollution Textile industries prepare fibers; transform fiber into yarn and then yarn into fabric. Subsequently, these fabrics go through several stages of wet processing (Holkar et al., ). It is well known that adsorption by activated carbon is an effective and commercially applicable method for removing colour and other pollutants from textile and dye wastes.

Porter () suggested that carbon adsorption is a complete treatment for textile by: But due to high export demands of textile materials, textile producers are extensively using synthetic dyes. These synthetic dyes have complex aromatic structure which is resistant to light, ozone.

with dyes wastes are predominant. Dyes are widely used in many industries such as textile dyeing, food, cosmetics, paper printing, leather and plastics, with textiles industry is the major consumer. The number of synthetic dyes presently utilizes in textile industry is aboutrepresenting an.

Decolorization of synthetic textile dye (methyl red) waste water using constructed wetlands is investigated as crop plants, including human beings5. Traditionally, the dye effluents are treated 9. G.R. Brower and G.D. Reed, Economic pretreatment for colour removal from textile dye wastes.

In pro. 41 purdue industry waste Conf. Lafayette. Textile dyeing industry is considered as one of the largest generators of toxic chemical wastewater in India. Wastewaters from textile dyeing industries were studied for the decolourization and removal of degradable organics with tapioca sago wastewater as a co-substrate in a pilot scale two-phase Upflow Anaerobic Sludge Blanket (UASB) by: and residual dye.

% of textile dyes are lost during the dyeing process, and % is directly discharged as aqueous effluents in different environmental components. Traditionally produced fabric contains chemical residues, used during their manufacturing. These chemical residues may evaporate in air or may absorb.

(). Removal of Synthetic Textile Dyes From Wastewaters: A Critical Review on Present Treatment Technologies. Critical Reviews in Environmental Science and Technology: Vol. 41, No. 9, pp. Cited by: Colour Removal of Reactive Dye from Textile Industrial Synthetic dyes are used extensively in textile wastewater and it is usually treated before it leaves the textile plant.

The issue of textile wastewater is generally colour removal as there are complexities in many types of dyes (Saranraj, The percentage of colour removal of reactive. and benzene derivatives output from dyes and pigment dyes and pigment aniline, ammonia and N-based organic waste is very toxic and hazardous in also several other by product like dyes and dyes intermediates colour compound generated waste produced during manufacturing process.

Get this from a library. Application of exchange resins for treatment of textile dye wastes. [Allison Maggiolo; National Environmental Research Center (Corvallis, Or.); United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development.]. Dye Removal from Textile Wastewater Using Bioadsorbent 64 A scientific journal of COMSATS – SCIENCE VISION Vol No.1 (January to June ) 65 S.M.H.

Gardazi, Tayyab Ashfaq, Jehanzeb A. Shah, Maria Siddique, S. Tatheer A. Naqvi, M. Bilal & Iftikhar A. RajaFile Size: KB.

The use of synthetic chemical dyes in various industrial processes, including paper and pulp manufacturing, plastics, dyeing of cloth, leather treatment and printing, has increased considerably over the last few years, resulting in the release of dye-containing industrial effluents into the soil and aquatic ecosystems.

The textile industry generates high-polluting wastewaters and their. Dyes are widely used to colour products in textile, leather tanning, cosmetics, pigment and many other industries. Effluents discharged from these industries cause potential hazards to environment and human health.

Hence, the removal of dyes from water/wastewater has gained a huge attention in recent years. The service life of a resin will depend on a number of factors, including the chemical makeup of the stream to be treated, the type of IX process and resin used, how often regeneration cycles are needed, the hydraulic load of the resin, and whether any extreme process conditions exist.

IX resins degrade gradually with use, making it difficult.The patent-pending Nano-Dye TM turn-key system is designed with the strategic intent to use the textile dye plant’s current exhaust dye equipment and dyestuff library.

Nano-Dye TM ’s break-through dyeing technology now allows cotton exhaust dye jets to use no salt and exhaust up to 99% of dyestuff (eliminating solid waste).